For Friday, and responses to Rothfeld

  1.  Work on your essay 3, which is due on Wednesday.  If you haven’t, come to your meeting with me–I will email a reminder in advance; if you need to reschedule, let me know.
  2. Read Rothfelt (p. 437–link to online version on post below). Post an observation as a comment here.
  3. Continue blogging/responding, especially if you haven’t posted recently.
Advertisements

11 thoughts on “For Friday, and responses to Rothfeld”

  1. The Rothfelt text provided an interesting take on modern romance and the position of women in these relationships. Waiting as a form of feminine love, and the concept that waiting, love and feminism are all tied together is a refreshing and fascinating interpretation of love in today’s society. Rothfelt’s version of love is clearly an intense and authentic version of such an emotion, as her final three paragraphs are filled with the most extreme and devoted expressions of love. Yet, her ideas of waiting as a representation of love questions the way in which love is enacted, and the conventions of love in society today. Why is it women that wait for men? Why is waiting a feminine activity? Is this purely a perpetuated version of an antiquated convention or is there something in today’s society that requires the female waiting? For instance, the highly controversial expectations of a man in today’s society encourage the waiting of the woman in the section “The Day-After Text”, in which women are expected to wait for the man to get in contact. These are all aspects that I had never thought of before, and reading Rothfelt’s text was eye-opening in many ways.

    Like

  2. I was intrigued when I began reading this essay as I wasn’t sure where the author was going to go with it. It was definitely an attention grabbing way to start the essay. I think his take on modern love isn’t something I would have concluded this. The analogy of hunger is very interesting, I’m also not sure how I feel about him using Catholic figures in comparison to a submissive character in a movie. I feel like Catherine of Siena is a relevant example of how this type of romance dates way back, but it should have been separated a bit form the opening analogy of submission.

    Like

  3. I thought the piece “Ladies in Waiting” by Rothfelt was very interesting. It was a unique direction she decided to go in with the piece by talking about romance and love in the form of waiting. Rothfelt was able to connect these two these to describe modern love. I liked the use of analogies as well in this piece. The introduction to the writing was an analogy of submission, which worked very well with the whole piece. Overall, this piece was very interesting and I liked it a lot. It was great being able to get a new perspective on modern love that I would have never have thought about.

    Like

  4. This concept the author uses is really unique. That women are waiting for men throughout life. For them to be the first to make a move, to message them first, and men proposing to women. This is something I never, However, some examples she uses are better than others. Using Penelope from the Odyssey is the best because she waits 20 years for her husband to come back home, but after a long 20 years, that is when she thinks about moving on. Something I have never though about but I do really like this essay!.

    Like

  5. Rothfelt presents an interesting dynamic between a sadistic man and his lover. The way it is written shows various forms of love (ie. waiting, submission, and starvation). It is a rather dark piece, but it is a critical analysis as well. I enjoyed Rothfelt’s voice throughout that is consistently observational and critical. She spruces up her piece with evidentiary support which I also liked. My favorite part was the “Day-After Text”. I appreciated the author’s perspective on women and feeling almost passive to what a man does because of societal standards. Overall, I really thought this piece was well written and a great analysis.

    Like

  6. In this piece Rothfeld touches on a topic I’ve never really stopped and really thought about before, the role waiting plays in love. It’s maybe because I was so easily able to relate to the agony of waiting she described, that I found the overarching point she was trying to make kind of iffy. I certainly agree that historically in relationships women were the idle participant, waiting for the man to take action with their love. But to insinuate that still today women are alone in having to play the waiting game in relationships is definitely not entirely true. Also, using the 2002 film Secretary as an example or evidence of women waiting in relationships was incredibly weak. Sure, movies may often reflect the current social climate, but not only was this 15 years ago, it’s also a ridiculously exaggerated relationship.

    Like

  7. The author’s thoughts on women in waiting were very compelling. Of course the discussion of modern forms of waiting in the age of social media and online dating resonated with someone my age, but it was the historical basis of this phenomenon that particularly struck me. Classic literature often depicts women waiting for men, whether it be from war or some other venture, and it was perceived as natural. This is ultimately reflective of the role in society women are often relegated to, which is gate keeping passivity relative to the man. The author’s allusion to Whitman’s work further demonstrates this notion while also drawing attention to the emotional burden associated with this form of waiting, which often goes overlooked.

    Like

  8. As I read Ladies in Waiting, I wasn’t expecting the first few sentences to be about a movie in which the female is being sexually tortured by her sadistic boss. It certainly caught my attention to keep reading. I think this essay speaks a lot of truth about the view of love as being feminine and the reason is because it makes you weak and so men in general tend to dismiss the idea of being romantic and showing their love. But nowadays, I think the roles have switched, it is gentlemen in waiting because I have noticed from a lot of female friends how they play the same scenes as men used to according to this book. Also, I found it very intriguing that communication like texting is used as a way to determine who is the powerful and who is the powerless in a relationship. I wouldn’t thought of it at first but the fact she mentions it makes it more obvious. She also does a good job in analyzing and giving her own opinion about the scenes and poems she used to make her point.

    Like

  9. It is an intriguing opening of the essay that I hadn’t expected before I read it. An interesting topic is brought up by Rothfeld. Though waiting is consuming, it is necessary in some sense. It seems to me that she scrutinized and carefully evaluated the role of waiting plays in romantic relationships. And I do like the poems she embedded in this essay.

    Like

  10. I really liked how the other framed this essay by first talking about the origin of romance, and how it morphed into how we come to understand “contemporary romance” in the modern age of technology (and social media). I thought her view on the element of waiting as it relates to relationships was interesting as well because I had never really given it much thought. I think that social media and how technology play such crucial roles in our lives really affect our relationships negatively because we can end up in a vortex of waiting for texts from people were in a relationship with and that in and of itself can drive someone insane. I think that Rothfelt illustrates this paradigm wonderfully.

    Like

  11. The author does a great job in the begging of the piece to be able to grab the readers attention right off the bat which is crucial. One of the reasons this piece was so interesting to read was his perspectives about relationships. You are able to tell that Rothfelt’s emotion was clearly seen throughout the piece with the word use and details he fills the story in with. The idea of waiting as a form of love was also one that I found very interesting because it was something I have never thought about prior. The piece uses a lot of great analogies and perspectives that seem new to the reader.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s